• Jeremy

Managing Computers with Broken Supply Chains

So, it’s gotten difficult to buy… almost everything. Computers are certainly one of the devices that are hard to come by. Here are some thoughts on how to navigate this situation.



1. Keep Spares

We’d suggest keeping about 5% spare computers (i.e. if you have 100 staff, keep 5 spares). Ordering computers right now is challenging and can take many additional weeks with unclear ETAs on delivery. Not great when you hire someone new. An easy fix is to just have a few extra machines to supply to new staff and to replace devices that fail. To avoid them “going stale”, just ensure you use a first in first out principle so that you deploy the oldest spare and order a new one to replace it.


2. Device as a Service (Often called DaaS)

This is basically renting computers. Rather than always getting quotes and buying computers, we make a standardized arrangement with a supplier, such as Dell, Lenovo or Microsoft. You predefine options and just request units when needed. Faster and easier than buying. When new staff start, you just choose from the pre-set options, and request the device. When you consider the time and effort to quote and buy machines, we predict you’ll save time with this model. If this sounds like an interesting option for you, let's discuss setting it up.


3. Asset and Warranty Tracking – Plan ahead

For our Managed Services clients, we automatically track all devices. Part of this service is the ability to track when computers should be retired and replaced. With our monthly reports, you’ll know if you should be replacing x number of devices in a few months, and can order ahead. You can also tag devices as spares to help track them, so you always have that 5% of spare devices available, as discussed above.


No matter how you manage computers, make sure you're taking advantage of AutoPilot. This "zero touch" computer deployment is mandatory in our post-covid world of remote work. We set it up with all of our clients. Ask us for more details.

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